Saturday, 5 October 2013

Tyto Wetlands (Part 2)

...more birds from Tyto Wetlands (see Part 1)

I was lucky enough to capture a basking freshwater turtle and a male Australian Darter in the one image.

Australasian Darter, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

After the turtle departed, the Darter remained, in all his glory.

Australasian Darter, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Comb-crested Jacanas were seen in several places and this one allowed close approach while it hunted among the lily pads.

Comb-crested Jacana, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Red-winged Fairy-wrens were seen in many places but their perpetual motion and proclivity for remaining in the centre of bushes made them difficult to photograph.

Red-backed Fairy-wren (male), Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld
Red-backed Fairy-wren (female), Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Both Varied Triller and White-winged Triller calls were heard and this male White-winged Triller in breeding plumage cooperated nicely for some close-ups.

White-winged Triller (male), Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Willie Wagtails were seemingly everywhere and this one posed nicely so I couldn't resist a quick snap.

Willie Wagtail, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Several pairs of Masked Lapwings had small chicks and this adult was captured uttering the "duck and cover" call.

Masked Lapwing, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

Pied Currawongs could be heard in many places around the wetlands but it wasn't until I was back in the car park that I managed to find one close enough to photograph and, in this case, I almost had too much lens needing to take several steps backwards to get the whole bird in the frame.

Pied Currawong, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham Qld

2 comments:

  1. HI Ian Loved this post and all the photos especially the Red backed Fairy Wren. Not easy to photograph.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Margaret,
      It's taken too long to find time to add these. Plenty more to come.
      Cheers, Ian

      Delete

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